Archives par étiquette : tarifs traduction

Language of the Week: Thai !

thai

Thai is the native language to approximately 60 million people in Thailand This coutry has become one of the most popular tourist destinations in south Asia, known for its wild party scene and its beautifully serene beaches. There are very distinct differences between the dialects that are spoken in the north, north east and south of the country.

Language of the Week: Norwegian

norwegian

If I mention Norway, what is the first thing that you think of? Did the word Viking pop into your head? That is because Norwegian comes from Old Norse, which was the language of the Vikings. There are actually two written forms of Norwegian, one called Dano-Norwegian or Bokmål, which comes from the 1500s when it was under rule of Danemark, and the second is Nynorsk, which only 8% of the population uses.

Norwegian is very similar to English and hence is said to be pretty easy for English speakers to learn. There are 29 letters in their alphabet, the first 26 are the same as the English alphabet, the other three letters below are the special ones:

Alltradis a 20 ans!

alltradis a 20 ansL’aventure a commencé en 1995, sous le nom d’Alltrad Services, dont les plus jeunes d’entre vous se souviennent certainement… 20 ans de travail acharné pour vous proposer encore et toujours de la qualité et les services de professionnels dont la traduction est avant tout le métier. 20 ans aussi de rencontres, d’échanges, de réunions, de congrès, des centaines de milliers de kilomètres parcourus par nos équipes pour aller à votre rencontre… vous qui malgré la crise de 2008 et la mondialisation, continuez à nous être fidèles !

Alors, du fond du coeur, et de la part des 70 personnes qui composent notre famille (traducteurs, interprètes de conférences, chefs de projets, équipe commerciale, assistants, techniciens, graphistes, médecins-relecteurs) : MERCI !!

Alltradis compte en 2015 plus de 2.000 clients, gère l’intégralité des portefeuilles de traduction de plusieurs groupes internationaux, et participe à plus de 300 réunions stratégiques par an dans tous les domaines techniques de pointe (médical, cosmétique, luxe, mode, pharmaceutique, juridique, énergie, aéronautique, et tant d’autres…).

Agence de traduction Alltradis

L’agence de traduction Alltradis est aujourd’hui incontournable sur le marché de la traduction et de l’interprétation de conférence.

Notre expérience, acquise depuis quasiment 20 ans à travers la traduction écrite de plus de 19.000 projets multilingues et la traduction simultanée des plus grands congrès mondiaux, nous confère aujourd’hui un statut de référence qualité dans plusieurs domaines (traduction médicale/pharmaceutique, traduction cosmétique/luxe/mode, traduction technique, traduction juridique,  traduction marketing/finance/RH, etc).

Pour en savoir plus, veuillez consulter notre site web: www.alltradis.com

Language of the Week: Korean

korean

안녕하세요 (annyeonghaseyo) hello!

As you may have guessed, the language of this week is Korean!

Korean is the official language of both the Republic of Korea (South Korea) and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (North Korea) which is a total of approximately 73 million people. Korean is written in a script is called Hangeul and it is said that the basics of Hangeul can be learned in just a few hours.

In the Korean alphabet, there are consonants:

1 consonants

 

And then there are double consonants:

2 double consonants

 

 

There are vowels:

3 vowels

 

 

And then there are Complex vowels:

4 complex vowels

 

 

 

Characters are written from up to down or from left to right and always start with a consonant.

5 writting

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you want to write only the vowel, it must be written with the consonant o.

Original vowel Written by itself

 

When writing in Korean, characters are written to fill an imaginary box and letters can be stretched or compressed to fill in the space of the box and to make it evenly sized with the other syllables. For example, you can see below how the size and shape of the letter ㄱ changes to fill in this imaginary box.

6 characters

 

 

Like always, here are some simple phrases for you to try out:

Korean Pronunciation English
어떻게 지내세요? eotteohke jinaeseyo? How are you?
만나서 반가워요 Mannaseo bangawoyo Pleased to meet you
제 이름은 … 입니다 je ireum-eun … imnida My name is…
감사합니다 kamsahamnida Thank you
미안합니다! mianhamnida Sorry
실례하겠습니다! shillehagessumnida Excuse me
모르겠습니다 moreugesseumnida I don’t understand

In Korea, there are some rules of etiquette; make sure to bow to new acquaintances and elders, hugging and kissing is generally out of the question and there is an “honorifics” system which dictates different verb endings and vocabulary to use depending on your relationship with the person. In North Korea, there is a specific verb ending for addressing their leader, Kim Jong-il. What this means is that you have to add 옵 [-op-] at the end whenever you are addressing him.

That’s all for today, 안녕!(annyeong) bye!

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


Lessons from a Translation Agency Internship

I’m concluding my four-month internship at Alltradis in a few days’ time.

SplitShire_IMG_6131-800x500

Unlike Alltradis’ previous interns, I’m not a translator, nor am I aspiring to be one. I’m a communication major. Upon graduation, I’m going to be blogging, tweeting, and writing press releases and news stories. In fact, I will probably never translate a piece of text professionally, and I’m fine with that. College majors aside, this internship has still been an invaluable experience for me as a communicator and storyteller.

During my internship, I did a lot of research on translation, interpretation, and languages. I curated and shared the most interesting, unusual, and useful facts and figures about languages and the translation industry. Taking a deeper look into the impact of translation, and the changing landscape of the translation industry made me a better communicator. Here are some lessons I’m taking away with me:

Write a clear, concise, compelling source text

It seems stupidly obvious, but the formula for excellent translation is simple. In the end, it comes down to a well-written source text and an experienced and culturally-sensitive translator. As I writer, I rarely think about how my writing will look once translated. However, knowing in the back of my mind that my writing is going to be translated makes me think twice about my choices. I find myself asking “Is this a clear metaphor? Is this the perfect word?” All these extra thoughts make me a more mindful communicator.

Decide on what service is best for the project

Like most people, I used to think the translation was made up only of two services: translation (of the written word), and interpretation (of the spoken word). While this is the foundation of translation, knowing all the available language services is incredibly helpful. Services like transcreation and localization is foreign to many writers. However, knowing the pros, the cons, and the process of these services can be incredibly useful for some projects, not to mention, save a lot of money and headaches.

Talk to the translator

Personally, I believe that you should trust your translator and your work to be as compelling and clear in the new language, just as it is in the source language. But depending on how important the project or intricate the writing, it may be beneficial or necessary to speak with the translator. Especially when working with a new translator or translation agency, it might be necessary to explain to them the specific linguistic choices you made, and the tone you are aiming for. In the end, your translator holds the pen (or the mic) to your voice in a new language!

Even as a non-translator, I’m taking away many valuable lessons from this internship, biggest being the ability to see the interconnectivity of language. Whether as a writer, translator, publisher, or a marketer, knowing how a piece of text will work in another language and culture is an important skill to have. Communication goes far beyond words. Understanding this will undoutably create more thoughtful and culture-concious communicators.

Thanks for reading my posts for the last four months!

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


Website Makeover!

Happy December! The elves at Alltradis have been hard at work to make Alltradis more accessible online. Here’s the scoop:

WEBSITE MAKEOVER (1)

First, have you noticed something different on our website? Yes, we’ve had a little makeover! Our chic, new website is much more beautiful and better organized. It’s easier to navigate, with a few updated features, like our chat, which allows you to chat live with our Commercial and Communication manager.

social media

We’ve also made ourselves available to you on various social media platforms. We’ve been working hard to stay connected with our clients and the translation community through various social media platforms.

You can connect with us via:

We hope these updates will help us serve you better.

 


Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


How Translation Adds Value

How Translation Adds Value

From books to movies, instruction manuals to ads, I’ve been watching, reading, and listening to translated materials all my life. I know what makes bad translation, but never gave a second thought about what makes a good one.

Since starting at Alltradis, I’ve been more conscious of what constitutes good translation. In the end, the answer was quite simple: good translation adds value. Take, for example, a cosmetic company. Many wheels must turn, and do so in harmony, to make it into a success in a competitive market. A well-made product, beautiful packaging, effective marketing—these qualities add value to the brand. So does good translation.

The ultimate goal of translation is to translate so that the brand’s words and identity resonates across all cultures.

How does translation add value? How I see it, there are three big ways:

  1. Thinking globally as the brand
  2. Translating the brand
  3. Understanding the market and the project

Thinking globally as the brand
In every language and culture, there are linguistic preferences and nuances. Even when a phrase is grammatically correct, small linguistic hiccups can disturb the fluidity or professional façade. For example, Nike is famous slogan, “Just do it.” It is memorable, and impactful. Its literal translation in Chinese, however, doesn’t carry the same meaning and impact. Translators opted for “Have sport,” which may be confusing in English, but impactful in Chinese. Knowing the languages are important, but knowing how they work is just as essential in great translation.

Translating the brand
Brand image and identity often influences the tone in which the brand communicates with its clients. While Google opts for a friendly, familial tone, Chanel remains a little distanced, professional, and reserved. The brand identity can take years to create. Its language professionals must be aware of the corporate culture and patterns to translate the essence of the brand. This only comes with years of experience with the same brand, which places importance on trust and loyalty between business and its translator.

Understanding the market and the project
Every market or industry has a certain style and speech pattern. Only experienced translators know how to navigate through the different industries, and know the linguistic nuances and linguistic preferences of the market. In the detail-oriented world of the medical and the pharmaceutical industries, a small misuse of a word ccome with grave consequences. In the creative world of marketing, however, incorporating puns, and references can be smart and funny.

All this is to say translation is more than just churning out words. Adding human elements to the work, like considering the cultural and corporate context and the market, and doing it well is what sets good translation agency apart from great ones.

A great translation agency has:

  • open flow of communication with the client (and welcomes input),
  • knowledge and experience in your market and brand,
  • a translation-proofreading process, and is open to communicate about it, and
  • (or is willing to reccomend) creative copywriters or specializing proofreaders, should your project require them.

Can you think of other ways translation adds value to your brand and to your project? And what other qualities do great translation agencies have?

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


Translating Crisis

Tower of London

Much of human history is marked by war. For centuries, translators and interpreters stood behind closed doors of negotiations and the front-lines of combat. Over time, warfare and diplomacy tactics has unrecognizably changed. Regulation, training, and laws protecting and educating interpreters in places of war and crisis, however, have not caught up.

Local translators are hired on the basis of their fluency in two languages needed for interpretation, as well as their knowledge and rapport with the community in which they are translating in. Case studies have shown that many interpreters “have not undergone training in interpreting… Thus they lack both essential professional skills to perform adequately as interpreters, as well as the necessary professional ethics to support crisis management and humanitarian efforts in a stressful environment.” (Bali & Moser-Mercer, 2008).

These interpreters enter warzones with little professional, emotional, and physical skills to cope and protect themselves. On top of this, their profession often put their families at risk, too. Interpreters are branded as infidel, traitor, or unpatriotic for working alongside the occupiers. As a consequence, their lives, as well as their families’ are in danger, even after the soldiers march out.

Legal measures were made by occupying countries like the United States, Canada, and United Kingdom, who created visa programs for locals served their military. However, none have been very successful. Here’s a clip from “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver,” where Oliver outlines the progress and flaws of the American Special Immigrant Visas:

As seen in the video, not only is the bureaucratic process of obtaining a visa complicated, but it is not even guaranteed. America’s neighbours like Canada and the United Kingdom have implemented similar programs, although they all seem to face the same issues and flaws.

The nature of translation makes its professionals invisible. However, this should not make them invisible in front of the law or protection. Their courage and service should not be forgotten. Their safety cannot be compromised. This Remembrance Day, we recognize the unsung heroes of war.

Bali, G., & Moser-Mercer, B. (2008, June 3). Interpreting in zones of crisis and war. Retrieved November 10, 2014.

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


La précarité énergétique, une des problématiques incontournables de notre siècle…

Alltradis précarité énergétiqueL’agence de traduction et d’interprétation de conférence Alltradis, en partenariat avec l’ADEME (Agence de l’Environnement de la Maîtrise de l’Energie) et l’ONPE (Observatoire National de la Précarité Energétique) a assuré les traductions simultanées du dernier colloque sur la précarité énergétique, le 03 octobre dernier sur Paris. Plus de 11 millions de personnes, soit un cinquième de la population française, éprouvent des difficultés à se chauffer et s’éclairer, selon une évaluation de l’ONPE, qui préconise de renforcer les aides au paiement des factures via un chèque énergie.

Sont actuellement considérés en précarité énergétique les quelques quatre millions de foyers – soit environ huit millions de personnes – consacrant plus de 10% de leurs revenus à leurs dépenses en énergie au sein de leur logement. Mais cette définition, résumée par la notion de taux d’effort énergétique, est jugée trop approximative par l’ONPE. «Elle fera regarder comme précaires des habitants qui ne se soucient pas vraiment de leur facture et négligera d’autres dont l’effort n’est réduit qu’au prix d’une auto-restriction qui menace leur bien-être», relève son président, Jérôme Vignon, cité dans le rapport.

L’ONPE propose dès lors de combiner plusieurs indicateurs, comme le taux d’effort, le niveau de revenus, les comportements (moins se chauffer pour faire des économies, par exemple) et le ressenti du froid (en raison notamment d’une installation de chauffage insuffisante ou d’une mauvaise isolation). Sur cette base, «l’ensemble des populations en situation de précarité énergétique dans leur logement serait de l’ordre de 5,1 millions de ménages (et 11,5 millions d’individus), soit environ 20% de la population totale», souligne-t-il.


Qui sommes-nous? 

Agence de traduction AlltradisL’agence de traduction Alltradis est aujourd’hui incontournable sur le marché de la traduction et de l’interprétation de conférence.

Notre expérience, acquise depuis quasiment 20 ans à travers la traduction écrite de plus de 19.000 projets multilingues et la traduction simultanée des plus grands congrès mondiaux, nous confère aujourd’hui un statut de référence qualité dans plusieurs domaines (traduction médicale/pharmaceutique, traduction cosmétique/luxe/mode, traduction technique, traduction juridique,  traduction marketing/finance/RH, etc).

Pour en savoir plus, veuillez consulter notre site web: www.alltradis.com


Translating the new Canada

blog 1

At one point or another, every Canadian will be asked: « Are you from English Canada or French Canada? »

There are many misconceptions about the Great White North, our multilingual tongues being among the biggest.

First, there is a misunderstanding that all Canadians speak French.

Unfortunately, no. There are measures in place to ensure Canadian students are exposed to their second official language. It is mandatory for students between the grades 4 to 8 to take second language classes, and optional immersion programs. However, many students discontinue their second language learning after 8th grade. Even if students continue taking second language classes until high school graduation, the chances retaining what they’ve learned into adulthood is very slim without constant education and exposure. All of Canada is bilingual, albeit at varying degrees. Some Canadians are able to hold intelligent debates in both official languages, whereas others can barely utter « bonjour » with confidence. Nevertheless, English and French hold equal power across the land, and Canadians can be served in either official language.

Then, there is the polar opposite that French is only spoken in Québec, or that French is the only language used in Québec.

On the opposite end of the spectrum is the belief that Quebec is the only francophone part of Canada. While it is the most famous and the biggest francophone province, this belief neglects strong francophone communities in the other twelve provinces/territories. What many foreigners don’t know is that not only is French the official language of the entire country, but is recognized as the official language for four other provinces/territories besides Quebec. There are many prominent francophone communities in every province, as there is large number of Anglophones in Quebec.

English and French are the only languages spoken in Canada.

While officially English and French are Canada’s official languages, they are not its first nor only languages. Over 60 indigenous, 200 immigrant, and handful of Canadian dialects and mixed languages are still alive and thriving in parts of Canada.

Indigenous languages

According to the most recent census, nearly half a million Canadian reported they spoke an indigenous language. While this isn’t an overwhelming number against Canada’s total population of 35million, the preservation of languages are impressive. While many immigrant languages get replaced by English or French with each generation, many families with indigenous tongue keep their language alive in the home. Although the statistic varies depending on the language, 90~97% indigenous speakers use their mother tongue at home.

Immigrant languages

1/5 of Canadians have a mother tongue other than French or English, according to 2011 census. Depending on the region, it isn’t uncommon to see advertisements, signs, or announcements be made in a third language. As a country built on immigration and multiculturalism, Canada’s languages reflect this.
For example, take Coquitlam, British Columbia, the mid-size suburban city in Metro Vancouver where I grew up. Here, the immigrant to non-immigrant population is almost at par. In fact, the top three working languages in the city are English, Chinese, and Korean. French trails in at #4, but significantly behind: Korean to French ratio is 10:1.

Not surprisingly, this is reflected in day-to-day life: many supermarket signs read English, Chinese, and Punjab, advertisements read only in Chinese, and free translation services are offered for school report cards. The Coquitlam school district was one of the first in Canada to introduce a Mandarin Bilingual Program for its youngest pupils. Similar to French immersion programs, students take half of their curriculum in English and the other half in Mandarin.

This system of third language-official language immersion program are not unique to Mandarin nor to B.C. In Manitoba, Ukrainian-English immersion program has been established much earlier. And all across Canada, students can also study a minority language such as Punjab, Arabic, and even Scottish Gaelic.

Canadian dialectes and langages

Canadian Languages (1)

These are just some of the languages and dialects, unique to Canada. Although this map doesn’t identify the exact location of where these languages are spoken, it illustrates the general idea. The east coast has abundance of dialects and unique languages adopted from original European immigrant languages. In the Praries, there are languages like Michif and Bungee, which take indigenous tongues and borrow English or French words or syntax.
What does this all mean?

Canada is a country found on immigration, and its openness to other languages and cultures is undeniable. There is a growing effort and attention to « bi/multi-lingualize » its youngest citizens. As more Canadians adopt second or third languages, so will their businesses.

What languages can your business speak? Let us help you: http://www.alltradis.com/

Information for this article has come from:

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us