Archives par étiquette : interprétation

Interprète : qui es-tu..?

Que fait un interprète- (2)

Les interprètes de conférence sont souvent appelés à tort « traducteurs » et le grand public ne perçoit pas nécessairement les différences entre ces métiers. Comment les distinguer ?

Le terme de « traduction » désigne l’activité qui consiste à transposer un texte écrit d’une langue A vers une langue B. L’activité de l’interprète, elle, se déroule oralement et dans un contexte spécifique.

Dans les deux cas, il ne s’agit pas d’un transcodage de mots d’une langue dans une autre, et dans les deux cas, le travail intellectuel requis présente des similitudes.

L’interprétation repose sur la langue orale, tandis que la traduction porte sur l’écrit. De ce fait, l’interprétation emprunte des canaux linguistiques spécifiques : les propos de l’orateur sont tenus oralement, passent par la voix et la prosodie, utilisent également la rhétorique, la gestuelle et l’intonation.

Lessons from a Translation Agency Internship

I’m concluding my four-month internship at Alltradis in a few days’ time.

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Unlike Alltradis’ previous interns, I’m not a translator, nor am I aspiring to be one. I’m a communication major. Upon graduation, I’m going to be blogging, tweeting, and writing press releases and news stories. In fact, I will probably never translate a piece of text professionally, and I’m fine with that. College majors aside, this internship has still been an invaluable experience for me as a communicator and storyteller.

During my internship, I did a lot of research on translation, interpretation, and languages. I curated and shared the most interesting, unusual, and useful facts and figures about languages and the translation industry. Taking a deeper look into the impact of translation, and the changing landscape of the translation industry made me a better communicator. Here are some lessons I’m taking away with me:

Write a clear, concise, compelling source text

It seems stupidly obvious, but the formula for excellent translation is simple. In the end, it comes down to a well-written source text and an experienced and culturally-sensitive translator. As I writer, I rarely think about how my writing will look once translated. However, knowing in the back of my mind that my writing is going to be translated makes me think twice about my choices. I find myself asking “Is this a clear metaphor? Is this the perfect word?” All these extra thoughts make me a more mindful communicator.

Decide on what service is best for the project

Like most people, I used to think the translation was made up only of two services: translation (of the written word), and interpretation (of the spoken word). While this is the foundation of translation, knowing all the available language services is incredibly helpful. Services like transcreation and localization is foreign to many writers. However, knowing the pros, the cons, and the process of these services can be incredibly useful for some projects, not to mention, save a lot of money and headaches.

Talk to the translator

Personally, I believe that you should trust your translator and your work to be as compelling and clear in the new language, just as it is in the source language. But depending on how important the project or intricate the writing, it may be beneficial or necessary to speak with the translator. Especially when working with a new translator or translation agency, it might be necessary to explain to them the specific linguistic choices you made, and the tone you are aiming for. In the end, your translator holds the pen (or the mic) to your voice in a new language!

Even as a non-translator, I’m taking away many valuable lessons from this internship, biggest being the ability to see the interconnectivity of language. Whether as a writer, translator, publisher, or a marketer, knowing how a piece of text will work in another language and culture is an important skill to have. Communication goes far beyond words. Understanding this will undoutably create more thoughtful and culture-concious communicators.

Thanks for reading my posts for the last four months!

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


Website Makeover!

Happy December! The elves at Alltradis have been hard at work to make Alltradis more accessible online. Here’s the scoop:

WEBSITE MAKEOVER (1)

First, have you noticed something different on our website? Yes, we’ve had a little makeover! Our chic, new website is much more beautiful and better organized. It’s easier to navigate, with a few updated features, like our chat, which allows you to chat live with our Commercial and Communication manager.

social media

We’ve also made ourselves available to you on various social media platforms. We’ve been working hard to stay connected with our clients and the translation community through various social media platforms.

You can connect with us via:

We hope these updates will help us serve you better.

 


Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


How Translation Adds Value

How Translation Adds Value

From books to movies, instruction manuals to ads, I’ve been watching, reading, and listening to translated materials all my life. I know what makes bad translation, but never gave a second thought about what makes a good one.

Since starting at Alltradis, I’ve been more conscious of what constitutes good translation. In the end, the answer was quite simple: good translation adds value. Take, for example, a cosmetic company. Many wheels must turn, and do so in harmony, to make it into a success in a competitive market. A well-made product, beautiful packaging, effective marketing—these qualities add value to the brand. So does good translation.

The ultimate goal of translation is to translate so that the brand’s words and identity resonates across all cultures.

How does translation add value? How I see it, there are three big ways:

  1. Thinking globally as the brand
  2. Translating the brand
  3. Understanding the market and the project

Thinking globally as the brand
In every language and culture, there are linguistic preferences and nuances. Even when a phrase is grammatically correct, small linguistic hiccups can disturb the fluidity or professional façade. For example, Nike is famous slogan, “Just do it.” It is memorable, and impactful. Its literal translation in Chinese, however, doesn’t carry the same meaning and impact. Translators opted for “Have sport,” which may be confusing in English, but impactful in Chinese. Knowing the languages are important, but knowing how they work is just as essential in great translation.

Translating the brand
Brand image and identity often influences the tone in which the brand communicates with its clients. While Google opts for a friendly, familial tone, Chanel remains a little distanced, professional, and reserved. The brand identity can take years to create. Its language professionals must be aware of the corporate culture and patterns to translate the essence of the brand. This only comes with years of experience with the same brand, which places importance on trust and loyalty between business and its translator.

Understanding the market and the project
Every market or industry has a certain style and speech pattern. Only experienced translators know how to navigate through the different industries, and know the linguistic nuances and linguistic preferences of the market. In the detail-oriented world of the medical and the pharmaceutical industries, a small misuse of a word ccome with grave consequences. In the creative world of marketing, however, incorporating puns, and references can be smart and funny.

All this is to say translation is more than just churning out words. Adding human elements to the work, like considering the cultural and corporate context and the market, and doing it well is what sets good translation agency apart from great ones.

A great translation agency has:

  • open flow of communication with the client (and welcomes input),
  • knowledge and experience in your market and brand,
  • a translation-proofreading process, and is open to communicate about it, and
  • (or is willing to reccomend) creative copywriters or specializing proofreaders, should your project require them.

Can you think of other ways translation adds value to your brand and to your project? And what other qualities do great translation agencies have?

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


Translating Crisis

Tower of London

Much of human history is marked by war. For centuries, translators and interpreters stood behind closed doors of negotiations and the front-lines of combat. Over time, warfare and diplomacy tactics has unrecognizably changed. Regulation, training, and laws protecting and educating interpreters in places of war and crisis, however, have not caught up.

Local translators are hired on the basis of their fluency in two languages needed for interpretation, as well as their knowledge and rapport with the community in which they are translating in. Case studies have shown that many interpreters “have not undergone training in interpreting… Thus they lack both essential professional skills to perform adequately as interpreters, as well as the necessary professional ethics to support crisis management and humanitarian efforts in a stressful environment.” (Bali & Moser-Mercer, 2008).

These interpreters enter warzones with little professional, emotional, and physical skills to cope and protect themselves. On top of this, their profession often put their families at risk, too. Interpreters are branded as infidel, traitor, or unpatriotic for working alongside the occupiers. As a consequence, their lives, as well as their families’ are in danger, even after the soldiers march out.

Legal measures were made by occupying countries like the United States, Canada, and United Kingdom, who created visa programs for locals served their military. However, none have been very successful. Here’s a clip from “Last Week Tonight with John Oliver,” where Oliver outlines the progress and flaws of the American Special Immigrant Visas:

As seen in the video, not only is the bureaucratic process of obtaining a visa complicated, but it is not even guaranteed. America’s neighbours like Canada and the United Kingdom have implemented similar programs, although they all seem to face the same issues and flaws.

The nature of translation makes its professionals invisible. However, this should not make them invisible in front of the law or protection. Their courage and service should not be forgotten. Their safety cannot be compromised. This Remembrance Day, we recognize the unsung heroes of war.

Bali, G., & Moser-Mercer, B. (2008, June 3). Interpreting in zones of crisis and war. Retrieved November 10, 2014.

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


Translating Adopted Words

On any given day in my household, you will hear my mom announce, « I’m going to the super [shoo-puh]! Do you need anything? » Where do you think my mom is going?

When I asked my American friends, their guess was unanimously « superintendent » (of an apartment building). Actually, Koreans have adopted the word « super » as a shorthand for « supermarket. » While the full compound word, « supermarket, » and its common, North American shorthand, « market, » are also used, « super » is the most popular way of calling grocery stores.

This confusion isn’t limited to multilingual settings:

-I like your pants.- (2)

« I like your pants,  » I told a friend, alluding to her trousers. While none of the North Americans gave it a second thought, the Brits did a double-take. « Pants » in North America mean trousers, whereas the word is synonymous to undergarments in the UK.

Language conforms to people, not the other way around. The process of mixing and borrowing words is neither new nor uncommon. Even within one language, definitions and connotations continually change. Here are some English words that have changed definition over time:

  • heartburn
    • used to mean: jealousy or hatred
    • now means: an unpleasant hot feeling in your chest caused by something you ate
  • artificial
    • used to mean: full of artistic and technical skill
    • now means: not natural or real or sincere
  • awful
    • used to mean: commanding awe
    • now means: extremely bad or unpleasant

(see more from source)

The inevitable and continual evolution of language challenges content creators, translators, and consumers. Creators and consumers must be conscious about word choices, and consider possible discrepancies. Of course, it is impossible for one person to be aware of all literal and cultural meanings, so we must opt for the most reasonable definitions. For the content middleman (ie. translators, interpreters), there is an extra step. They must understand the original text and culture so perfectly that its translation fits into the second culture naturally.

Machines have successfully replaced people in many professions. But in the realms of translation, our ability to understand a piece of text on multiple levels has proven invaluable and irreplaceable. Vocabulary and grammar is one aspect of language and translation, but understanding the undertone and emotions behind those words cannot be taught or programmed.

The basic qualification of translators is their fluency in two languages’ grammar and vocabulary. The second qualification is the cultural understanding of places in which those languages are spoken in. Translation professionals must be up-to-date on cultural hot-words, changed definitions, unspoken rules and connotations.

Have your seen our blog post on hilarious translation fails?

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


Translating the new Canada

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At one point or another, every Canadian will be asked: « Are you from English Canada or French Canada? »

There are many misconceptions about the Great White North, our multilingual tongues being among the biggest.

First, there is a misunderstanding that all Canadians speak French.

Unfortunately, no. There are measures in place to ensure Canadian students are exposed to their second official language. It is mandatory for students between the grades 4 to 8 to take second language classes, and optional immersion programs. However, many students discontinue their second language learning after 8th grade. Even if students continue taking second language classes until high school graduation, the chances retaining what they’ve learned into adulthood is very slim without constant education and exposure. All of Canada is bilingual, albeit at varying degrees. Some Canadians are able to hold intelligent debates in both official languages, whereas others can barely utter « bonjour » with confidence. Nevertheless, English and French hold equal power across the land, and Canadians can be served in either official language.

Then, there is the polar opposite that French is only spoken in Québec, or that French is the only language used in Québec.

On the opposite end of the spectrum is the belief that Quebec is the only francophone part of Canada. While it is the most famous and the biggest francophone province, this belief neglects strong francophone communities in the other twelve provinces/territories. What many foreigners don’t know is that not only is French the official language of the entire country, but is recognized as the official language for four other provinces/territories besides Quebec. There are many prominent francophone communities in every province, as there is large number of Anglophones in Quebec.

English and French are the only languages spoken in Canada.

While officially English and French are Canada’s official languages, they are not its first nor only languages. Over 60 indigenous, 200 immigrant, and handful of Canadian dialects and mixed languages are still alive and thriving in parts of Canada.

Indigenous languages

According to the most recent census, nearly half a million Canadian reported they spoke an indigenous language. While this isn’t an overwhelming number against Canada’s total population of 35million, the preservation of languages are impressive. While many immigrant languages get replaced by English or French with each generation, many families with indigenous tongue keep their language alive in the home. Although the statistic varies depending on the language, 90~97% indigenous speakers use their mother tongue at home.

Immigrant languages

1/5 of Canadians have a mother tongue other than French or English, according to 2011 census. Depending on the region, it isn’t uncommon to see advertisements, signs, or announcements be made in a third language. As a country built on immigration and multiculturalism, Canada’s languages reflect this.
For example, take Coquitlam, British Columbia, the mid-size suburban city in Metro Vancouver where I grew up. Here, the immigrant to non-immigrant population is almost at par. In fact, the top three working languages in the city are English, Chinese, and Korean. French trails in at #4, but significantly behind: Korean to French ratio is 10:1.

Not surprisingly, this is reflected in day-to-day life: many supermarket signs read English, Chinese, and Punjab, advertisements read only in Chinese, and free translation services are offered for school report cards. The Coquitlam school district was one of the first in Canada to introduce a Mandarin Bilingual Program for its youngest pupils. Similar to French immersion programs, students take half of their curriculum in English and the other half in Mandarin.

This system of third language-official language immersion program are not unique to Mandarin nor to B.C. In Manitoba, Ukrainian-English immersion program has been established much earlier. And all across Canada, students can also study a minority language such as Punjab, Arabic, and even Scottish Gaelic.

Canadian dialectes and langages

Canadian Languages (1)

These are just some of the languages and dialects, unique to Canada. Although this map doesn’t identify the exact location of where these languages are spoken, it illustrates the general idea. The east coast has abundance of dialects and unique languages adopted from original European immigrant languages. In the Praries, there are languages like Michif and Bungee, which take indigenous tongues and borrow English or French words or syntax.
What does this all mean?

Canada is a country found on immigration, and its openness to other languages and cultures is undeniable. There is a growing effort and attention to « bi/multi-lingualize » its youngest citizens. As more Canadians adopt second or third languages, so will their businesses.

What languages can your business speak? Let us help you: http://www.alltradis.com/

Information for this article has come from:

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


5 Must-Watch Translation and Interpretation Films | #ALLTRADISt9nDay 4

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September 30 of each year is International Translation Day. This year, we are celebrating International Translation Day with ten themes highlighting this industry. Some will be funny, others heartwarming— we hope to generate discussion about a field focused on being undetectable, and interest even non-translators and interpreters to join the conversation. You can follow our updates on Twitter @ALLTRADIS or follow our discussion by following #ALLTRADISt9nDay.

Many know, some love, but all sympathize with the famous scene from Sofia Coppola’s film, Lost in Translation. This film is the most notable movie about the industry, and this film, is the most prominent line in the film. Although it’s a very brief moment, it accurately depicts the important role quality translation and interpretation has.

Given so, there are few films revolving around translation and interpretation. We did some digging around IMDB and our personal collections, and here are some of our favourites that aren’t Lost in Translation:

The Interpreter

Of course, life of most interpreters is not nearly dramatic as one portrayed by Nicole Kidman. However, this film does an excellent job portraying the important role interpreters play at international reunions. The movie was also filed inside the U.N. General Assembly and Security Council, with special permission from then-Secretary General, Kofi Annan.

Judgment at Nuremberg

This film is actually based on the Nuremberg Trials of 1945. The Trials are historically important for interpreters, as it was where simultaneous translation was debuted. Simultaneous interpretation is an essential technique for international reunions, conferences, and still in trials. Since its debut, simultaneous interpretation has become much quicker, smoother, and regulated process. Nonetheless, it’s very interesting to see how it all started.

Women with the Five Elephants


(Note: This clip is in German with French subtitles)

Svetkaba Geier is an acclaimed Russian to German translator, responsible for introducing Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s literary works to non-Russian audience. This biopic explores Geier’s eventful and fascinating life, which has seen the frightening regimes of Stalin and Hitler. She skillfully and meticulously transforms the same language that spoke hatred and fear during those destructive years, and turns them into beautiful and enlightening literary masterpieces.

Failsafe

The fictional story a Cold War nuclear crisis captures the tensions between Soviet Union and United States. It depicts the sensitivity of language and stress interpreters face at time of diplomatic or political crisis. Of course, it is also an excellent film portraying the vital role interpreters play in international, multicultural, multilingual situations.

Annie Hall

This is my personal favourite, although I may be cheating, since it doesn’t exactly follow suit of translation and interpretation in the traditional sense. Woody Allen’s classic presents how even speakers of the same language sometimes don’t truly understand each other through communicating via thought subtitles. If you watch the scene without any sound, you get a completely different interpretation of the scene, as if you listen without watching the screen. It also hints at the important role translators and subtitlers have in our basic cinematic experience. Imagine, what would happen if all subtitlers decided to slack on their jobs!

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


Famous Translators/Interpreters | #ALLTRADISt9nDay 5

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September 30 of each year is International Translation Day. This year, we are celebrating International Translation Day with ten themes highlighting this industry. Some will be funny, others heartwarming— we hope to generate discussion about a field focused on being undetectable, and interest even non-translators and interpreters to join the conversation. You can follow our updates on Twitter @ALLTRADIS or follow our discussion by following #ALLTRADISt9nDay.

Thupten Jinpa
the Dalai Lama’s English interpreter

Dalai Lama Visits Seattle To Start US TourEven the most interpreters at European Parliaments admitted that the Dalai Lama is one of the toughest speakers to interpret, due to the subtlety and different nuances words carry. Thupten Jinpa has been the Dalai Lama’s principal English translator since 1985. He has had a long history with the Dalai Lama, even before Jinpa’s accidental beginning to interpretation/translation work. Jinpa is a Montreal-resident, Mcgill-educator, philosopher, author, and former monk. To hear more about Jinpa’s experience and view on interpretation, listen to this interview.

Interview: http://www.onbeing.org/program/translating-dalai-lama/235 .

 

Amber Galloway-Gallego
Kendrick Lamar’s sign language interpreter at Lollapalooza 2013

Amber G-GGalloway-Gallego is a professional music to American Sign Language interpreter. She is best-known for her very enthusiastic and hilarious interpretation of rapper Kendrick Lamar’s show at Lollapalooza music festival in 2013. Her fame shed light to a growing community deaf concert-goers around the world. She explains her process, which steers clear of word-for-word interpretation, but adds the emotional, or sass, or the general je ne sais quoi element into music interpretation. You can watch an interview of her explaining her craft and process, and also watch her Youtube channel, where she interprets Kendrick Lamar and other songs.

Her Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/1stopforasl
Interview: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LgHNcjYp7sE

Jack Jason
Marlee Matlin’s sign language interpreter

Jack JasonPossibly the most popular or recognized interpreter of all is actress Marlee Matlin’s voice, Jack Jason. Jason has been Matlin’s sign language interpreter for more than 25 years, and has been by her side on the set of the West Wing and Celebrity Apprentice. Jason animated enthusiasm and quick pace adds another dimension of personality to Marlee Matlin. You can read about his interview here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/nataly-kelly/meet-jack-jason-the-most-_b_901712.html

 

 

Valentin Berezhkov
Joseph Stalin’s German and English interpreter

Conversations informal meeting in the studyBerezhkov was educated as an engineer, but had picked up English and German from his parents. He was recruited while working in the navy, when during a peace pact talk between Soviet Union and Germany made in 1939, the Berlin embassy was short of interpreters. Without formal training and experience, Berezhkov was thrown into his diplomatic career, attending meetings with history makers like Hitler, Stalin, Churchill and Roosevelt, and being privy to highly valuable, top secret information. Even after the war, Berezhkov led an interesting international life.

You can read more about his life on his obituary: http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/obituary-valentin-berezhkov-1190576.html.

 

Edith Grossman and Gregory Rabassa
Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s translators

Greg Rabassa Edith GrossmanGarcia Marquez was never hesitant to give his translators the credit they deserve. He once gave the greatest compliment to the “One Hundred Years of Solitude” translator, George Rabassa, claiming he preferred the translated work to his own. He is also quoted many times giving high praise to “Love in the Time of Cholera” and “Strange Pilgrims” translator, Edith Grossman. It is safe to say that Garcia Marquez’s fame and popularity in the Anglophone world owes thanks to Grossman and Rabassa.

 

 

 

 

 

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us


5 Translation Mistakes You’re Making | #ALLTRADISt9nDay 6

ALLTRADISt9nDay-6

1. You chose the wrong translator/translation agency.

Bigger isn’t always better, and this is especially true with translation. While bigger agencies may have quick turn-around time or affordable rates, you may be jeopardizing quality. To save on time, these larger agencies may assign too many transaltors on a single project. Just as assigning multiple writers to a single essay is bound to cause incongruency and confusion, so will multiple translators or agency on one project.

Also, keep in mind that many smaller or medium-sized transation agencies have their « specialties. » Their experience, resources, and confidence in specific fields will certainly help you achieve the quality level you’re seeking.

Solution: Ask yourself what your priorities are, and invest in one translation agency.

2. Your source text is poorly written.

Need we say more? If your source text is unclear and uncompelling, its translation will be too. If you’re pooling resources to get a document translated, make sure it is well-written in its source langauge. In the case of technical writing, poor translation can result in fatal accidents. Ensure your original copy and your translation is written clearly and as compellingly as possible. The positive aspect of hiring smaller agencies is that you have the freedom of having contact with your translator. However, too much back-and-forth may cause misunderstanding and miscommunication.

Solution: Edit and proofread your source text rigorously before it is sent to the translator.

3. You’re expecting too much from your translator.

Translators translate. They are not editors, proofreaders, publishers, and marketers. Just as a writer wouldn’t publish his work without having it proofread by an editor, it is crucial your translation gets edited by a third person. Many offer this essential step for an extra price, or will not offer it at all.

At Alltradis, we double-proofread every one of our assignments to ensure top quality translation every time.

Solution: Research what your translation agency offer. Make sure your translated work is properly edited.

4. You’ve asked your bilingual coworker to translate.

Just as having two hands doesn’t make you a piano player, being bilingual doesn’t make you a translator. Being bilingual is the basic requirement to be a translator or interpreter. Translators go through years of meticulous training and practice to perfect their art. Bilingual coworkers can be helpful in understanding the gist of the text, you can’t expect the same quality of translation as translators provide.

Solution: Hire a translator!

5. You’re relying too heavily on translation technology.

This is similar to the previous mistake, but worse: it undermines the importance humanity! While services like Google Translate is improving at an impressive rate, there are things humans still dominate. People understand idioms, cultural references, metaphors, and technical terms. They pay attention to fluidity, congruency, and __ in ways machines do not.

Solution: Hire a translator (or be prepared for the consequences)!

6-proofread

Translation requires time and money. Making these silly mistakes can result in embarrassing, unprofessional or maybe even dire consequences. To summarize, here are 5 common mistakes and our simple solutions:

  • You chose the wrong translator/translation agency. → Ask yourself what your priorities are, and invest in one translation agency.
  • Your source text is poorly written. → Edit and proofread your source text rigorously before it is sent to the translator.
  • You’re expecting too much from your translator. → Research what your translation agency offer. Make sure your translated work is properly edited.
  • You’ve asked your bilingual coworker to translate. → Hire a translator (or be prepared for the consequences)!
  • You’re relying too heavily on translation technology. → Hire a translator (or be prepared for the consequences)!

 



Who are we?

Agence de traduction AlltradisAlltradis is today a key player in translation and conference interpreting.

Since its creation in 1995, Alltradis has translated over 19,000 written projects in various language combinations, organized simultaneous interpreting for the largest international conferences and gathered a long list of loyal clients. Alltradis has truly become a fundamental part of their success. We specialize in diverse industries such as; medical/pharmaceutical translation, cosmetic/luxury product translation, technical and industrial translation, marketing/finance/HR translation, legal translation, etc.

Many world leading companies trust our expertise – what are you waiting for? For more information, visit our website: www.alltradis.us